EMS Ambulance 10 May 2019


With the summer holiday season nearly upon us, many families are planning their holiday abroad. The vast majority of trips abroad go to plan, but occasionally a child falls ill or has an accident. In that situation, the only thing the parent wants is for the child to get home as quickly as possible. Thankfully the medical repatriation of children is no more difficult than repatriating adults. Our medical experts are experienced in children’s health, and we use the latest equipment and medical supplies. We can bring children home in as little as a few hours.


Will my travel insurance cover my child’s repatriation?

In most situations, travel insurance covers at least part of a medical repatriation. Travel insurers are sometimes more likely to recommend that children are medically repatriated than adults.

Travel insurance for children varies. You may have taken out a family insurance package if you’re going on holiday, or an individual insurance package if your child is travelling alone or with a sibling (on some airlines minors can be accompanied by someone 16 or over). If your child is travelling as part of a school trip, the school will have taken out group insurance, and you may have topped this up with individual insurance cover. Your child may also have an EHIC card which can cover some medical costs.

Travel insurance often covers repatriation, although an insurer might think that the medical facility abroad is adequate and not offer to pay for the trip home. This can be difficult when you, as a parent, want the best medical treatment possible for your child. But don’t worry if this is the case; at EMS Ambulance we will independently assess the medical condition of your child and make the best recommendation for their health and wellbeing.


When might my child need to be repatriated?

There are many reasons why your child might need to be repatriated. Perhaps your child has broken their leg on a school skiing trip, or fallen ill while away with friends or another family. Or your child might have an accident while visiting relatives or away at boarding school. Being ill away from home can be frightening, especially for a child, and particularly if they don’t speak the language at the local hospital.

In addition to this, sometimes medical facilities abroad aren’t as well equipped as hospitals at home, and might not have doctors who have been trained in the necessary speciality. And often, parents of a child who has fallen ill or had an accident abroad just want them to get home. Managing a journey with a severely ill or injured child can come with many challenges. Children are generally more vulnerable than adults and transporting them can carry significant risks.


What can EMS Ambulance offer?

Our experience and expertise in the medical repatriation of children make EMS Ambulance the ideal service to medically repatriate your child. Our doctors can visit your child in person to make an independent medical assessment, and, as we speak a number of languages, we can speak to the doctors there on their behalf if necessary. We will recommend the safest, quickest method of repatriation – either a medical escort on a commercial plane, a private air ambulance or an ICU equipped long-distance road ambulance.

En route, our fully qualified paediatric team will provide excellent care using state-of-the-art equipment. Your child can normally be accompanied by you on the journey. The EMS doctors will coordinate your child’s care with your doctor at home, and take them directly to your local hospital.

So don’t worry if the medical care that’s offered abroad isn’t right (even if the insurer thinks it is). We can give you the peace of mind that your child will receive the best treatment from medical experts and be brought home as quickly as possible.


Contact

If you would like to talk through your situation and find out about your options, please don’t hesitate to contact us. Alternatively, you can fill out our contact form to request a free quote – without any obligation – to get a clearer picture of what’s involved.